Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP)

Success Story: Soil Remediation at the Forillon National Park of Canada Operational Centre

Soil Remediation at the Forillon National Park of Canada Operational Centre

Success Story: Colomac Mine Remediation Project

Colomac Mine Remediation Project

Success Story: Soil Remediation on a First Nation Reserve: Kitasoo Remediation Project

Soil Remediation on a First Nation Reserve: Kitasoo Remediation Project

Success Story: Rock Bay Remediation Project

Rock Bay Remediation Project

Success Story: Oshawa Harbour Remediation Project

Success Story: Oshawa Harbour Remediation Project

Success Story: Swallowtail Lightstation Remediation Project

Success Story: Swallowtail Lightstation Remediation Project

Success Story: Cartier-Brébeuf National Historic Site of Canada

Success Story: Cartier-Brébeuf National Historic Site

The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) is a 15-year, $4.54 billion program that was established in 2005 by the Government of Canada.

The primary objective of FCSAP is to reduce environmental and human health risks from known federal contaminated sites and associated federal financial liabilities. In Phases I and II (2005-2011 and 2011-2016), the federal departments, agencies and consolidated Crown corporations responsible for contaminated sites (also referred to as custodians) made significant progress in assessing and remediating sites. Based on the most current data available as of March 2016, custodians conducted remediation activities at 1,590 sites, and completed remediation at 830 sites. Assessment activities were conducted at 10,420 sites and completed on 7,300 sites.

FCSAP Phase III (2016-2020) allows this work to continue, with a focus on remediating the highest priority sites. Remediation will take place at 612 sites across Canada with $1.25 billion of approved funding. Another $99.6 million has been approved for assessments and program management activities for a total investment of $1.35 billion over the next four years. In addition, Budget 2016 provided $217 million over two years, starting in 2016–17, to accelerate the assessment and remediation of contaminated sites for which the Government is responsible.

The Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory lists 23,078 federal sites. This number includes confirmed contaminated sites, suspected contaminated sites, and 15,386 closed sites where remediation was either completed or not required. In addition to addressing contaminated sites, FCSAP helps support skills development, training and employment of Canadians, including in Indigenous communities and others who live in northern and rural areas. It is also encouraging Canada’s environmental industry to develop innovative and sustainable remediation technologies and approaches.